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Anaphora

Anaphora

  • Gujind says:
    Anaphora is the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of each line of a poem, speech, or sermon. It can also be used in fiction, as in Charles Dickens' famous novel A Tale of Two Cities.
  • Tojind says:
    Anaphora, (Greek: “a carrying up or back”), a literary or oratorical device involving the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of several sentences or clauses, as in the well-known passage from the Old Testament (Ecclesiastes –2) that begins. For everything there is a season, and a time. for every matter under heaven: a time to be born, and a time to die;.
  • Nazilkree says:
    Repetition of the same word or group of words at the beginning of successive clauses, sentences, or lines. Examples This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, This fortress built by Nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war.
  • Kajisho says:
    Jun 09,  · Anaphora is a rhetorical term for the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive ciocazrodacastplotasadlapkyconnchess.coinfo building toward a climax, anaphora can create a strong emotional ciocazrodacastplotasadlapkyconnchess.coinfouently, this figure of speech is often found in polemical writings and passionate oratory, perhaps most famously in Dr. Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech.
  • Darg says:
    Feb 24,  · Anaphora is sometimes characterized as the phenomenon whereby the interpretation of an occurrence of one expression depends on the interpretation of an occurrence of another or whereby an occurrence of an expression has its referent supplied by an occurrence of some other expression in the same or another sentence. [] However, these are at best very rough characterizations of the .
  • Vikasa says:
    Anaphora definition, repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive verses, clauses, or sentences. See more.
  • Mizshura says:
    Anaphora (an-NAF-ruh): Figure of repetition that occurs when the first word or set of words in one sentence, clause, or phrase is/are repeated at or very near the beginning of successive sentences, clauses, or phrases; repetition of the initial word(s) over successive phrases or clauses.: Further Examples "That my heart has been troubled, that I have not sought this nomination, that I could.
  • Zulkijin says:
    Anaphora is typically found in writing at the beginning of successive sentences. Anaphora is an effective tool to help convey an argument. The three previous sentences are an example of anaphora. The sentences begin with the phrase, “Anaphora is.” A speaker or writer will use anaphora .
  • Gardazragore says:
    Anaphoric definition is - of or relating to anaphora; especially: being a word or phrase that takes its reference from another word or phrase and especially from a preceding word or phrase. How to use anaphoric in a sentence.

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